Being Asian and wearing masks in places others aren't


A woman with a protective face mask walks on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan, US, October 26, 2020. [Photo/Agencies]

Last Saturday marked the beginning of spring break for many primary schools and some colleges in Texas. It was also the first weekend after Texas' 100 percent reopening beginning on March 10 by Governor Greg Abbott's executive order, which also removed the mask mandate.

With some young children in our extended family, we, the five of us, decided to take a trip to the local destination Old Town Spring located north of Houston.

Old Town Spring became a small booming town when the International and Great Northern Railroad was built through it in 1871. The town was rumored to have been robbed by Bonnie and Clyde, the infamous American bank robbery team. It declined after the railroad was closed. When the oil boom came to Texas, the downtown area was transformed into a commercial district with more than 150 unique shops, restaurants and art galleries.

Main Street was all hustle and bustle when we arrived in the late morning. Both sides of the street were full with parked cars, and we had to drive around to find a parking spot in a small alley.

The first shop we went into was an antique store. We were greeted with a warm "hello" from a woman in her 30s, wearing no mask. 

We wandered through the store browsing. The shop was converted from a small house just like many other stores in the town, so we basically had to rub shoulders with other customers. Slowly it dawned on us that, other than us, the rest of the customers, just like the store clerk who said hello, were all white without masks. Some customers like us also had young children with them.

We suddenly became aware of how different we must look to the others: Asians with masks. That awareness immediately brought on a very uncomfortable feeling: We stood out and might not belong.

We left the store, stood on the sidewalk and had a good look around: old folks and young folks, couples with young children, young parents pushing strollers, they were pretty much all white. The first few groups passing by had no masks.

My teenage niece began to panic a little. She has read news of Asians being verbally or physically attacked because COVID-19 originated from that region. She has been dreading the day when she will be required to go back to school for in-person learning because she fears she will be targeted due to her race. 

I, myself, felt a little fearful. I am very aware of attacks on Asian Americans in the US throughout the pandemic. Across the country, Asian Americans have been spat on, pushed around, yelled at "go back to your own country" and worse. 

A report by the Asian Pacific Planning and Policy Council has documented 3,795 such incidents between March 19, 2020, and Feb 28, 2021. Physical assaults accounted for 11 percent of the incidents. 

The media reported that an 89-year-old Chinese woman was slapped by two men and then lit on fire in New York. An Asian-American family of four was attacked by a young man with a knife in Midland, Texas. The injured victims included a 6-year-old and a 2-year old. Our fears weren't unwarranted. 

We continued to watch people in the street. A couple in their 40s came out of a shop wearing with black cloth masks. A little while later, another family walked by with masks dangling from their ears. We relaxed somewhat; we were not alone wearing masks.

The next store had a "Mask Required" sign on the door and we felt better. Everyone inside wore masks. 

For the rest of the trip, mask or no mask, all stores welcomed us with a warm "hello". That feeling of not belonging and fear gradually disappeared. The trip ended without incident. 

I am not a stranger to this part of town. Some in-laws live in the area, and I was a regular visitor before the pandemic. 

However, that Saturday, for a few moments, for the first time, I had a sense of not belonging and feared others around me. 

On the way back, I couldn't help but reflect on how the past year of divisive politics and the pandemic have poisoned our perception and, consequently, how we feel about others taking a different stand on masks.

2020年10月26日,美国密歇根州安阿伯市密歇根大学校园内,一名戴着防护面罩的女子正在散步。[图片/机构]上周六标志着德克萨斯州许多小学和一些大学春假的开始。这也是德克萨斯州州长格雷格·艾伯特的行政命令于3月10日100%重新开放后的第一个周末,该命令也取消了口罩的授权。我们一家五口带着几个年幼的孩子,决定去当地的目的地——位于休斯顿北部的老温泉镇。1871年,当国际铁路和北方铁路穿过它时,老城泉成为一个繁荣的小镇。据传,该镇被臭名昭著的美国银行抢劫队邦妮和克莱德抢劫了。铁路关闭后,它就衰落了。当石油繁荣来到德克萨斯州时,市中心被改造成了一个商业区,有150多家独特的商店、餐馆和美术馆。我们早上晚些时候到达时,大街上熙熙攘攘。街道两边都停满了车,我们不得不开车四处寻找一个小巷子里的停车位。我们走进的第一家商店是一家古董店。一位30多岁的女人热情地向我们打招呼,她没有戴面具。我们逛了逛商店。这家商店和镇上的许多其他商店一样,是由一栋小房子改建而成的,所以我们基本上不得不与其他顾客交往。慢慢的我们才明白,除了我们,其余的顾客,就像那个打招呼的店员一样,都是没有口罩的白人。像我们这样的一些顾客也带着年幼的孩子。我们突然意识到我们必须与众不同:带着面具的亚洲人。这种意识立即带来了一种非常不舒服的感觉:我们脱颖而出,可能不属于这里。我们离开商店,站在人行道上,环顾四周:老人和年轻人,带着小孩的夫妇,推着婴儿车的年轻父母,他们几乎都是白人。前几组路过的没有口罩。十几岁的侄女开始有点慌。她看过亚洲人被口头或身体攻击的新闻,因为新冠肺炎来自那个地区。她一直担心有一天她会被要求回到学校进行面对面的学习,因为她担心自己会因为种族而成为目标。我自己也有点害怕。我非常清楚在整个大流行期间美国的亚裔美国人受到的攻击。在全国范围内,亚裔美国人遭到唾弃、被推来推去、被吼“滚回你自己的国家”,甚至更糟。亚太规划和政策委员会的一份报告记录了2020年3月19日至2021年2月28日期间发生的3795起此类事件。人身攻击占事件的11%。媒体报道称,在纽约,一名89岁的中国妇女被两名男子扇耳光,然后被点燃。德克萨斯州米德兰市,一个亚裔美国四口之家被一名持刀年轻男子袭击。受伤的受害者包括一名6岁和一名2岁的儿童。我们的担心不是没有根据的。我们继续观察街上的人们。一对40多岁的夫妇戴着黑布面具从一家商店出来。过了一会儿,另一家人戴着面具从他们耳边走过。我们放松了一些;我们并不是唯一戴着面具的人。下一家商店的门上有“需要面具”的标志,我们感觉好多了。里面的人都戴着面具。在接下来的旅途中,无论有没有口罩,所有的商店都热情地向我们打招呼。那种不归属感和恐惧感逐渐消失。旅行平安无事地结束了。我对这一带并不陌生。一些公婆住在这个地区,在大流行之前我是常客。然而,那个周六,有那么一瞬间,我第一次有了一种不归属感,害怕身边的人。在回来的路上,我不禁思考过去一年的分裂政治和流行病如何毒害了我们的看法,以及因此我们对其他人在面具上采取不同立场的感受。

上海久汇纺织科技有限公司

公司总机:021-58991190

销售业务部:

15601673666 胡女士

纺织新材料供应部:

18049721407 梁工

http://www.starpont.com 

EMAIL:

starpont@126.com

  • 申久集团开展安全宣讲及安全风险辨识培训活动
    为贯彻“安全第一、预防为主、综合治理”的安全生产工作方针,进一步增强企业员工的安全意识,根据《江苏省工业企业风险报告规定》(省政府令第140号)等相关文件要求以及璜泾镇安全工作部署要求,申久集团组织安全管理人员开展了一次安全宣讲及安全风险辨识培训活动。
  • 2021潮流服装消费趋势报告(CBNData)
    CBNData联合淘宝直播ON MAP发布《2021潮流服装报告》,基于CBNData消费大数据,洞察在国潮、奥运主题大热的情况下,2021年潮流服装如何寻求增长。
  • 2021防晒趋势白皮书(CBNData)
    第一财经商业数据中心(CBNData)发布《2021防晒趋势白皮书》,分析防晒行业从市场格局到消费者需求的新变化,并总结出“全面防护、防养合一、效率至上、体验升级”四大防晒消费新趋势。
  • 2.4亿人想穿,一年订单猛涨133%,被嫌弃的黑丝又翻红了(CBNData)
    当女明星和爱豆们腿上长满了黑丝,这个前些年被嫌弃得不行的单品,如今又成了潮流风向标。
  • 淘宝直播2021年度报告(CBNData)
    2020年,直播进入了快速普及阶段,各个新品牌也纷纷开始带货。直播电商下半场,用户价值在何处?淘榜单、淘宝直播联合淘宝直播ON MAP推出的《淘宝直播2021年度报告​》,对淘宝直播的用户商业价值和货品品类进行了分析,以便品牌和商家了解行业新趋势。
  • 2021精致妈妈生活及消费趋势洞察(CBNData)
    CBNData联合复星发布《精致妈妈的生活“三重奏”——2021精致妈妈生活及消费趋势洞察》,报告以一群来自高线城市,兼顾高学历、高收入的精致妈妈为代表,通过调研精致妈妈们在不同场景下的需求,结合阿里巴巴消费大数据、公开数据及多场景数据,揭示了新时代精致妈妈如何在承担妈妈责任的同时正视自我,在舍得之间实现人生追求,并总结出了精致妈妈们消费的三大趋势。
  • 2021中国消费品牌发展报告(CBNData)
    阿里研究院发布《2021中国消费品牌发展报告》,研究发现,疫情过后消费者更多倾向于就近与居家自助服务,线上线下融合发展使得情境组合丰富多样,消费场景重要意义凸显。
  • 2022春夏上海时装周作品发布报名通道开启
    2022春夏上海时装周作品发布报名通道开启 ,可扫描二维码了解详情。
  • 如何快速有效地鉴别 纺纱工艺与纱线品种
    就是用眼看手摸来鉴别纤维的方法。原理是根据各种纤维的燃烧特性与外观形态、颜色、光泽、长短、粗细、强力、弹性、手感和含杂情况等,依靠人的感觉器官来定性鉴别纺织纤维的方法。此法能快速鉴别各种纺织原料,且不借助于仪器,极为实用。